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Trinity Roots at Subnine

These boys have become so popular, tickets to the Friday night gig were sold out well in advance, compelling them to perform again the following night.

18 Aug 2002

Trinity Roots + guests
Subnine, WELLINGTON
Friday, August 10

Since their album release two months ago, Trinity Roots have hit new heights in the music industry.

These boys have become so popular, tickets to the Friday night gig were sold out well in advance, compelling them to perform again the following night.

Local DJ Vee spun some old school hip hop beats to get jiggy with, but it wasn't long before the sardine packed crowd grew restless for the boys they were all there to see.

At last Wellington's most loved band stepped up to perform one of their smoothest sets, reminding the massive just how far they've come.

Warryn's charismatic stage presence and heavy distortion pedal use provoked an already amped crowd onto the verge of a mosh, but with the Wellington bred boys at the helm, smiles and smooth moves were abundant amongst the True followers. Rio characteristically gave the bass line addicts their fix throughout the set.

Subnine stayed true to its name by keeping the temperature cool, while drummer Riki intensified the excitement of the room. The boy's jammed out funked up album greats including old favourites 'Little Things' and 'Nothing to be Loved', as well as tracks destined for their second album like 'Two by Two'.

Vocally charged Stefanie Hearfield graced the stage with silk-coated harmonies for the tantalising ballad 'Passion'.

The lads constantly thanked contributors, including special guests Jonathon Crayford; who faultlessly tickled the ivories, and accompanying percussionist Chris Connor, while saving most of their gratitude to the Wellington massive for their endless support.

As expected, the crowd was not finished with the boys when they retreated offstage, coercing them to squeeze out two more encores including funky 'Just Like You' and an exceptional cover of Bob Marley's 'Them Belly Full'. After countless thank you's Warryn, Riki and Rio departed, leaving a satisfied crowd to their own devices.

Mu wasn't quite up to keeping the majority of punters on the dance floor, (really, who would want to follow those guys?) but the handful that did stay were treated to more local goodness like 'Midnight Marauders' from Fat Freddy's Drop.

Out back groupies were treated to a feast of New Zealand talent. Members of the Black Seeds and Jon Toogood chilled out, while the Trinity boys came to terms with such a successful gig.

"It's good to have the home crowd back," Rio Hemopo beamed.

Warryn Maxwell said it was great to be performing live again.

"Now I guess we'll sleep and do it all over again tomorrow."